Beware of OTCAI – Review

The OTCAI “click a button” Ponzi scheme has come crashing down.

OTCAI was launched in April 2022 and lasted a little over a month until the fraudsters behind it shut it down.

Attempts to reach OTCAI’s website at the time of writing resulted in a “connection denied” message.

On the prospect of promised profits, OTCAI affiliates bought in tether (USDT).

The “click a button” Ponzi scheme used by OTCAI involved trading activity created by hitting a button.

Of course, this was nonsense. OTCAI was just repurposing invested assets to pay dividends.

OTCAI’s MLM division offered rewards on affiliate investor recruitment:

• 15% for level 1 (personally recruited affiliates)

• ten percent at level two

• level 3 (5% of the population)

The usage of a Boris CEO set OTCAI apart from all the cookie-cutter “click a button” software Ponzis:

“Romser Bennett” was a typical Boris CEO actor with an eastern European accent, as one might imagine.

Boris CEOs are mainly created by Russian con artists, whereas “click a button” Ponzis originate in Southeast Asia.

In the arena of scams, OTCAI argues that there may be some overlap.

Either the Chinese are farming out manufacturing to the Russian Boris CEO factory, or the Russians are farming out their app Ponzis to China.

It’s worth noting that OTCAI isn’t the first Ponzi “click a button” software to have a Boris CEO. 365 Ball also had one.

In any case, OTCAI was only around for a short time, therefore the financial consequences of its demise were minimal.

However, according to SimilarWeb, OTCAI plummeted around the time of high investor recruitment activity:

Ghana (30%), Indonesia (17%), Peru (8%), and Russia (8%) were the major sources of visits to OTCA’s website in May 2022. (5 percent ).

OTCAI is one of a slew of “click a button” software Ponzis that have shown up in recent months.

COTP – pretended affiliates clicking a button created trading activity, collapsed in May 2022 • EthTRX is a comparable app-based Ponzi, but without the daily work component • Yu Klik – pretended affiliates clicking a button generated trading activity, targeting Indonesia

• KKBT – pretended that clicking a button generated cryptocurrency mining revenue, targeted South Africa and India and went bankrupt in early June 2022. • EasyTask 888 – pretended that clicking a button was linked to social media manipulation (YouTube likes), targeted Colombia, and went bankrupt in early June 2022.

• DF Finance — claimed to click a button to produce “buy data” that was sold to ecommerce platforms, but eventually went out of business in June 2022.

• Shared989 – claimed that clicking a button was linked to social media manipulation (YouTube likes, for example), but it was shut off in June 2022.

• 86FB — claimed that pressing a button was linked to betting on the outcome of football matches, but it was shut down in April 2022.

• 0W886 – claimed that hitting a button was linked to betting on the outcome of football matches, but it was shut down in May 2022.

• U91 – pretended that hitting a button was linked to betting on football match outcomes, but it went bankrupt in May 2022. • 365Ball – also pretended that clicking a button was linked to betting on football match outcomes, but it went bankrupt in May 2022. (has collapsed multiple already)

• YLCH Football – claims that pressing a button is linked to betting on the outcome of a football match.

• Parkour – assumes that pressing a button has something to do with social media manipulation (YouTube likes, etc.)

There are a lot more of these frauds out there that I haven’t yet discovered.

The fraudsters behind all of the recent app-based tasks Ponzis appear to be the same.

I believe the organization is based in China or Singapore, based on the use of classical Chinese.

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